The Telegraph Makes Its Case For Northern Greece

Halkidiki

"Is Halkidiki Greece's Best-Kept Secret?" is the headline of a recent major travel article in the London Telegraph, suggesting northern Greece as the perfect destination for Brits.

"These days, I submit," enthuses travel writer Mark Easton, "northern Greece makes perfect sense for British travellers in search of a bit more than a sunlounger and a carafe of the local retsina."

"The beaches are said to be the best on the Med," Eason continues. "The Germans first laid their towels on them decades ago but have recently been jostling for the best spots with Russians and Ukrainians."

Easton goes on to sing the praises of Thessaloniki, saying that "Thessaloniki is to the Balkans what Istanbul is to Asia Minor – an ancient and modern city sparkling with great museums and nightclubs that still echoes to the chants of rival civilisations."

He promotes the stunning finds of King Philip II's tomb museum in Vergina as worth the trip from the UK all by itself because of the riches on display there, especially "...the gold wreath that had been placed on Philip’s head. Exquisitely and delicately wrought in the form of 313 oak leaves and 68 acorns, it is a piece of jewellery so stunning that I would travel to northern Greece just to see it."

He also mentions Aristotle's birthplace of Stagira, but saves much of his praise for the focus on quality accomodations in Halkidiki during the last few decades, which have resulted in world-class resorts and hotels for vacationers in the region. Illustrating the ease of travel from the UK to Thessaloniki, he tells his British readers that "The Brits, belatedly, are realising a direct flight to Thessaloniki can deliver you to this overlooked corner of Europe in the time it might take for a rush-hour train to judder from Dorking to Balham."